Apr 01, 2020  
2012-2013 Graduate Catalog 
    
2012-2013 Graduate Catalog Archived Catalog

Courses


 

Electrical Engineering

  
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    ENEE 5320 - Neural Networks and Intelligent Control


    (3) Credit Hours

    Overview of intelligent systems. Learning; generalization; goal oriented behavior. Expert systems. Fuzzy logic. Introduction to neural networks. Incorporating intelligence into controllers. Design of fuzzy controllers. Design of neurocontrollers. Design of fuzzy neurocontrollers. Prerequisites: ENEE 5010 and 5020. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5330 - Non-Linear Control


    (3) Credit Hours

    Major methods for analysis of nonlinear control systems. Phase plane analysis, Lyapunov theory, passivity. Describing functions, feedback linearization. Sliding control. Prerequisite: ENEE 5020. Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENEE 5510 - Power System Reliability


    (3) Credit Hours

    Components and system modeling. Generating system reliability. Interconnected system reliability. Bulk power system reliability. Economics of reliability. Prerequisite: ENEE 5010. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5520 - Power System Operations


    (3) Credit Hours

    Power generation characteristics. Economic dispatch and methods of solution of the thermal dispatch problem. Transmission losses and loss formulas in the economic dispatch. Coordination equations. Unit commitment problem and an introduction to dynamic programming. Economic dispatching with limited energy availability. Hydrothermal coordination problem. Cost equations. Power system control and security. Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENEE 5540 - Electrical Machinery II


    (3) Credit Hours

    Development of transform methods for the design and analysis of electric machines. General reference frames are developed which embrace all other transforms for machine design and analysis. D.C. machines and synchronous and induction A.C. machines are covered. Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENEE 5610 - Power Electronics and Drives


    (3) Credit Hours

    Design and analysis of power electronic devices, including electric motor drives and switching power supplies. Synchronous power switching analysis methods are developed. Power switching devices are studied including their design constraints from both a component standpoint and from a circuit design stand point. Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENEE 5620 - Power System Protection


    (3) Credit Hours

    Protection fundamentals. Generator protection. Transformer, reactor and shunt capacitor protection. Bus, motor, and line protection. Pilot protection. Stability, reclosing and load shedding. Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENEE 5630 - Setting and Testing Digital Relays


    (3) Credit Hours

     

    The purpose of this course is to gain familiarity with test equipment and procedures when testing modern microprocessor-based multifunction transmission system protection. Experience will be gained in configuring and operating test equipment (60Hz voltage and current signals, as well as digital representations of those signals), calculating test quantities, making connections between relay and test sets, and analyzing results including all available sources of fault records (relay targets and internal oscillographic records). Supplementary course fee assessed.

  
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    ENEE 5640 - Transients in Power Systems


    (3) Credit Hours

    Voltage transients; breaker recovery voltage, switching surges, ferroresonance, lightning transients, capacitor switching transients and other nonlinear phenomena. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5650 - Sustainable Electric Energy Systems


    (3) Credit Hours

    Exploration of scientific and technological principles and practical conversion applications of sustainable electric energy sources including solar, wind, hydro, biomass, geothermal, and ocean. Understanding the fundamental concept of electric power system, electric power grid, and smart grid. Distributed generation and energy storage technologies as well as the economics of distributed resources. Power system issues associated with integration of distributed generation resources into the electricity grid/smart grid.
  
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    ENEE 5700 - Microcomputer Applications


    (3) Credit Hours

    Microcomputer systems architecture, advanced real-time signal interfacing techniques, I/O programming concepts, real-time realization of digital signal processing and filtering techniques. Projects included. Prerequisite: ENEE 5030. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5720 - Power System Analysis and Design


    (3) Credit Hours

    Power systems component modeling, transmission lines, machines, transformers. Load flow analysis, symmetrical components, symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault analysis. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5910r - Special Topics in Engineering


    (3) Credit Hours

    Selected advanced problems of current interest. Ordinarily, topics will cover those not available in other graduate courses. May be repeated. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5997r - Individual Studies


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Every semester. Prerequisite: department head approval. Department may have additional prerequisite requirements. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration. Credit hours allowed toward the degree may be limited. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5998r - Research


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Enables students to conduct independent research. Credit hours allowed toward the degree may be limited. Individual students contract required at the time of registration. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENEE 5999r - Thesis


    (1-6) Credit Hours

    The development of a project of thesis magnitude and quality. Oral defense required. Maximum of six hours graded credit to be applied toward degree. Must register for course until thesis is completed. Prerequisite: approval of department head. Supplementary course fee assessed.

Computational Engineering

  
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    ENCM 5010 - Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics


    (3) Credit Hours

    Elementary aspects of computational fluid dynamics (CFD); review of applicable numerical analysis techniques and fluid dynamics equations; use of model equations; development of basic numerical schemes; obtaining and interpreting numerical solutions to selected equation sets pertinent to the development and use of modern CFD methodologies. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Course is designed for senior or entry-level graduate students majoring in Engineering, Mathematics, Physics, or Computer Science. Elementary knowledge of FORTRAN or C/C++ programming is assumed.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 5100 - Computational Fluid Dynamics I


    (3) Credit Hours

    Review of integral and differential form of fluid dynamic equations; transformation from Cartesian to general curvillinear coordinates; review of relevant numerical analysis; development of various numerical schemes as applied to model equations; introduction to development of finite difference and finite volume methods for addressing time-dependent, multi-dimensional, compressible, inviscid (Euler) and viscous (Navier-Stokes) flow fields; introduction to computational boundary conditions; relevant literature. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Elementary knowledge of FORTRAN or C/C++ programming is assumed.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 5160 - Grid Generation


    (3) Credit Hours

    Approaches to computational geometry and grid generation; boundary conforming structured grids; unstructured grid systems; data structures; grid transformations; distribution functions; surface grid generation; solution of example grid-generation problems using existing software. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Elementary knowledge of FORTRAN or C/C++ programming is assumed.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 5210 - Introduction to Parallel Algorithms


    (3) Credit Hours

    Introduction to parallel and distributed computing; models of parallel computers; parallel programming models; network topologies; performance metrics; theoretical evaluation of algorithms; implementation of candidate algorithms on sample distributed memory and shared memory architectures; background for practical implementation of new algorithms on parallel architectures. Prerequisites: department head approval. (Intermediate knowledge of FORTRAN or C/C++ programming is assumed.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 5340 - Viscous Flow Theory


    (3) Credit Hours

    Physical and theoretical aspects of viscous fluid flow, from a perspective that provides fundamental background for computational simulation of viscous flows; development of mass, momentum and energy conservation equations for a Newtonian fluid; introduction to Cartesian tensors; development of boundary-layer theory; introduction to inviscid flow analysis; classical analytical solutions and experimental measurements for fluid flow problems; three-dimensional primary and secondary flows. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Background in undergraduate fluid mechanics, calculus, and ordinary differential equations is expected.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 5400 - Computational Structural Dynamics I


    3 Credit Hours

    Three hours lecture. Equations of motion; dynamic response of structural systems; static divergence and dynamic instabilities; introduction to flutter. Background in and familiarization with Newton’s laws, concepts in energy transfer, basic linear algebra, and vibratory response of systems. Prerequisite: department head approval.
  
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    ENCM 5500 - Practicum in Structured and Unstructured Flow Solver Development


    3 Credit Hours

    Techniques for generating valid structured and unstructured grids; implementing elementary numerical methods using grids; implementing characteristic variable boundary conditions; interpreting computed results. Working knowledge of FORTRAN or C/C++ programming. Standard letter grade. Prerequisite: approval of department head. Supplementary course fee assessed.
    3.000 Credit hours
  
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    ENCM 5900 - Advanced Programming for Physical Simulation


    (1) Credit Hours

    Selected topics in unix/linux; efficient use of various source code editors; basic programming techniques using C/C++ as applied to scientific applications; compiling and linking; debugging using command line and graphical user interface (GUI); memory leak detection, code profiling and optimizing; representing computed results using various software packages; other topics as needed; will be graded S/NC. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Elementary knowledge of FORTRAN or C/C++ programming is assumed.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 5910r - Special Topics in Computational Engineering


    (1-3) Credit Hours

    Selected advanced topics of current interest in computational engineering not available in other CmE courses; course material will be at the introductory graduate level; will be letter graded; may be repeated. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENCM 5997r - Individual Studies


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Every semester. Prerequisite: department head approval. Department may have additional prerequisite requirements. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENCM 7100 - Computational Fluid Dynamics II


    (3) Credit Hours

    Advanced topics in CFD solution algorithms; systems of conservation laws; characteristic-based inviscid flux formulations; viscous flux approximations; eigensystems for numerical flux computation; boundary conditions; iterative implicit algorithms for unsteady and steady problems. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Graduate level preparation in computational fluid dynamics equivalent to ENCM 5100 CFD I is expected.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 7160 - Adaptive and Dynamic Grid Generation


    (3) Credit Hours

    Concepts and methodologies of adaptive and dynamic meshing as applied to unstructured meshes; use of mesh movement and mesh refinement for adaptation; use of Linear-Elastic relations for dynamic meshing in conjunction with moving boundary problems (course will work exclusively with two-dimensional triangular meshes). Prerequisite: department head approval. (Graduate level preparation in numerical grid generation is expected.) Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENCM 7210 - Parallel Scientific Supercomputing


    (3) Credit Hours

    Scientific supercomputing for large, computationally complex simulation problems using parallel computers; parallel performance metrics and evaluation; scalability; parallel algorithms and scalable programming for complex field problems; emphasis on distributed memory machines using message passing. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Graduate level preparation in parallel programming equivalent to ENCM 5210 Introduction to Parallel Algorithms is expected.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 7310 - Computational Design


    (3) Credit Hours

    Concepts of design optimization, including mathematical programming methods for unconstrained and constrained optimization problems; derivation of discrete and variational sensitivity analysis techniques for direct and adjoint formulations for gradient computations; practical experience in using optimization programs with design applications; Emphasis on optimization problems where systems of partial differential equations are included as constraints (as in fluid and structural mechanics), and on problems involving shape optimization. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Graduate level preparation in computational fluid dynamics is expected; basic understanding of optimization methodologies is recommended.) Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 7340 - Viscous Flow Computation


    (3) Credit Hours

    Computational methods for the laminar and turbulent boundary layer equations; introduction to stability and transition; physical and mathematical description of turbulent mean flows; turbulence modeling; introduction to computational methods for the Navier-Stokes equations. Prerequisite: department head approval. (Graduate level preparation in viscous flow theory equivalent to ENCM 5340 Viscous Flow theory is expected. Elementary knowledge of FORTRAN or C/C++ programming is assumed.) Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENCM 7910r - Special Topics in Computational Engineering


    (1-3) Credit Hours

    Selected advanced topics of current interest in computational engineering not available in other CmE courses; course material will be at the doctoral level; will be letter graded; may be repeated. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.

     

  
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    ENCM 7950r - Doctoral Research


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Doctoral research. Graded SP/NP. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENCM 7997r - Individual Studies


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Every semester. Prerequisite: department head approval. Department may have additional prerequisite requirements. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENCM 7998r - Research


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Enables students to conduct independent research. Credit hours allowed toward the degree may be limited. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENCM 7999r - Dissertation


    (1-12) Credit Hours

    Doctoral research. Preparation and defense of doctoral dissertation. Continuous enrollment required. Graded SP/NP. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.

     


English

  
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    ENGL 5000 - Introduction to Graduate Studies in English: Methodology and Bibliography


    (3) Credit Hours

    Emphasis on contemporary methods and aims of research in literature, rhetoric, and writing; special reading designed to familiarize students with a wide range of available source materials and research writings. Students will produce a scholarly paper of article length.
  
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    ENGL 5050 - Theory and Criticism


    (3) Credit Hours

    Studies of major critics and historical developments (Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, Modern, Postmodern) with practice in applying major critical concepts. Students will produce a scholarly paper of article length.

    3 Credit hours Lecture

  
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    ENGL 5070 - Linguistics


    (3) Credit Hours

    A diachronic and synchronized treatment of selected linguistic topics: e.g., grammar, vocabulary, dialect, literary relationships, and pedagogy.
  
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    ENGL 5080 - Semiotics: The Study of Signs


    (3) Credit Hours

    Advanced study of semiotics, i.e., the science of interpreting intentional sign, both verbal and non-verbal, in the several sorts of languages used by human beings and animals, whether the signs are oral, inscribed, gestural, or in the organized use of space. Although useful to English majors in both the literary and the writing tracks, this course is appropriate to students in all disciplines in which the interpretation of signs or symbols, in whatever mode, is central to inquiry.
  
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    ENGL 5115 - History of Rhetorical Theory I: Ancient Greece to Renaissance


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of the history of rhetoric from its beginnings in Ancient Greece through the Renaissance with attention to the cultural contexts that influenced rhetoric’s development. Students will study rhetorical theory and practices of Ancient Greece and Rome and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. Required for Rhetoric and Writing Program. Offered in fall semester.
  
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    ENGL 5125 - History of Rhetorical Theory II: Early Modern to Contemporary


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of the history of rhetoric since 1600 with a close reading of the texts and attention to the cultural contexts that influenced rhetoric’s development. Students will study the theory and practice of rhetoric from the early modern era to the twenty-first century. Required for Rhetoric and Writing program. Offered in spring semester.
  
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    ENGL 5150 - Rhetorical Analysis


    (3) Credit Hours

    The use of rhetorical criticism to analyze cultural artifacts; to understand how symbolic systems construct their own persuasive realities; to practice oral and written rhetorical analysis in both individual and collaborative settings; to acquire some of the practical terminology common to the discipline of rhetoric and to become familiar with the rhetorical aspects of situations: context, symbols, environment, speech characteristics, writing characteristics, even clothes and color.
  
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    ENGL 5160 - Orality, Print, and Hypertext


    (3) Credit Hours

    An historical perspective on writing as a technology and the essential differences between human consciousness in oral cultures and human consciousness in writing cultures. Students will work to understand the historical and political underpinnings of the term “literacy.”
  
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    ENGL 5170 - Composition Theory


    (3) Credit Hours

    Selected readings in writing theory and research. Extensive practice in critical writing.
  
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    ENGL 5180 - Composition Studies as Cultural Critique


    (3) Credit Hours

    Composition studies has been marked by a turn toward cultural critique over the past decade. This critical turn draws on theories of Marxism, poststructuralism, feminism, and cultural studies which contend that our subjectivities—the screen through which we perceive reality—are shaped by cultural codes that generally control our behavior and perpetuate the status quo unless we resist the power of these discourses to determine our choices. Advocates of cultural studies and other critical approaches to composition instruction argue that reading and writing involve the negotiation of various discourses driven by these conflicting ideologies; thus, they see the ability to recognize these discourses as an important component of literacy skills.
  
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    ENGL 5190 - Writing Assessment: Theory and Practice


    (3) Credit Hours

    An overview of significant concepts related to the assessment of writing. An examination of key terms within the assessment field like “validity” and “reliability” as they relate specifically to the evaluation of writing. The phenomenology (a reader’s experiential process) of reading and evaluating texts. The importance of context to writing assessment and the way differing contexts (for example: classroom/instructional vs. program or larger-scale) influence assessment goals and practices. Special attention will be paid to interventional or response practices (formative assessment) intended to help students improve writing in addition to evaluation or grading of finished written products (summative assessment).
  
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    ENGL 5200 - Writing for Graduate Students I


    (3) Credit Hours

    The use of writing as a means of mastering difficult readings so that students reflect that mastery clearly, coherently, and concisely in finely tuned written products.
  
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    ENGL 5210 - Writing for Graduate Students II


    (3) Credit Hours

    Continuation of English 5200. Completion of English 5200 or permission of instructor required. Emphasis on developing the ability to apply, interpret, and evaluate in clear, concise, and coherent writing.
  
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    ENGL 5230 - Writing Essays for Publication


    (3) Credit Hours

    An advanced writing workshop where students will write several types of essays and learn the procedures for getting those essays published. By the end of the course, students will have composed between 100-200 pages of writing in the following forms: Creative/reflective journal; Listserv discussion; Profile/Interview; Issues Essay; Memoir; Radio Essay (for NPR); Wild Card; your choice.
  
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    ENGL 5240 - Business and Industrial Writing


    (3) Credit Hours

    Advanced study in the techniques and concepts of expository writing as used in business and industry, in scientific reports, technical analysis, brochures, periodicals, and intramural publications. Attention will be paid to the supervision and administration of such writing functions.
  
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    ENGL 5250 - Proposals and Prospectus Writing


    (3) Credit Hours

    Theory and practice in writing longer, more complex documents than those included in English 5240. In-house proposals, grant proposals, sales proposals, article proposals (queries), scholarly and technical articles, and annotated bibliographies are examples of the types of writing covered in the course.
  
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    ENGL 5260 - Practice of Teaching Writing


    (3) Credit Hours

    An examination of contemporary methods of teaching writing, with examples drawn primarily from the middle and secondary levels. Areas of inquiry will include designing research-based writing curricula, designing effective writing assignments, responding to student writing, teaching in the context of standardized tests of writing and evaluating writing.
  
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    ENGL 5270 - Teaching College Writing


    (3) Credit Hours

    A graduate seminar designed for students who are current or potentially future teachers of freshmen writing at UTC or other colleges or universities. The study of contemporary theories and practices of teaching writing at the university level.
  
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    ENGL 5290r - Advanced Internship in Writing


    (3) Credit Hours

    Supervised internship in a professional writing setting related to a student’s academic and/or career goals. Approval of internship coordinator during the fall semester is required for spring internships. May be repeated once, with a different internship setting.
  
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    ENGL 5350 - American Colonial and Federalist Literature: 1620-1820


    (3) Credit Hours

    An examination of the way American character is reflected in and shaped by writings of the period, including a study of such modes as autobiography, journals, and letters as well as religious, political, and literary texts. Includes such figures as Bradford, Edwards, Taylor, Cooper, and Irving.
  
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    ENGL 5360 - American Renaissance: 1820-1860


    (3) Credit Hours

    An exploration of various genres during a period when America was trying to define itself culturally and artistically, following independence. Includes such figures as Hawthorne, Melville, Poe, Thoreau, Emerson, Whitman, Stowe, and Fuller.
  
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    ENGL 5370 - American Realism and Naturalism: 1855-1918


    (3) Credit Hours

    An examination, through fiction, poetry, and criticism, of the development of American literature between the Civil War and W.W. I. Includes such figures as Mark Twain, Henry James, Edith Wharton, Stephen Crane, William Dean Howells, W.E.B. Dubois, and Adelaide Crapsey.
  
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    ENGL 5380 - Modern American Literature: 1912-1965


    (3) Credit Hours

    An examination through fiction, poetry, drama, and supportive critical works of the literature between W.W.I and the demise of certain writers in the 1960s, such as Hemingway and Faulkner. Includes other figures such as Fitzgerald, Langston Hughes, Marianne Moore, and T.S. Eliot.
  
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    ENGL 5390 - Contemporary American Literature: 1965 to the Present


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of selected fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama of the period, examining critical questions about canon formation, forces shaping current literature, and genre development. Includes such figures as John Barth, Ellen Gilchrist, Toni Morrison, William Least Heat Moon, A.R. Ammons, and Anne Sexton.
  
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    ENGL 5440r - Seminar: American Regional Literature


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of the literature of a particular region of America (such as Western, Midwestern, New England, or Southern), and its development in the context of landscape, history, language, ethnic groups, socio-economic conditions, and the larger nation. May be repeated only once, with different content. (See class schedule for current offerings.)
  
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    ENGL 5450r - Seminar: Genre in American Literature


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of a particular genre—fiction, poetry, drama, or essay—with consideration of form, development, and history. May be repeated only once, with different content. (See class schedule for current offerings.)
  
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    ENGL 5460r - Seminar: Ethnic Literature in America


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of one of the various bodies of ethnic literature that have developed from American’s diversity and pluralism, such as African-American, Italian American, Native American, Jewish-American, etc., with consideration of its relationship to the history of literature, to the history of America, and its reflections of the culture of the given ethnic group. May be repeated only once, with different content. (See class schedule for current offerings.)
  
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    ENGL 5470r - Seminar: Major Figures in American Literature


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of the writings of one to three authors. Includes consideration of biography, time and place, and relationship to literary history, forms, and themes. May be repeated only once, with different content. (See class schedule for current offerings.)
  
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    ENGL 5480r - Seminar: Themes in American Literature


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of a selection of writings which treat a prominent theme in American culture, in the context of the development of America and its literature. Themes might include religion, political ideology, the world of business, nature, education, perceptions of time and space. May be repeated only once, with different content. (See class schedule for current offerings).
  
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    ENGL 5490 - Modern and Post-Modern American Drama


    (3) Credit Hours

    An examination of major twentieth-century dramatic works, with emphasis on modern and post-modern drama as a reflection of intellectual, political, social, cultural, and economic developments of the twentieth century and their impact on the major modes of twentieth-century theatre.
  
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    ENGL 5510r - Fiction Writing


    (3) Credit Hours

    Students write fiction and criticize each other’s work; study fictional forms, techniques, and types from major critics of fiction; read and study published fiction with a view toward publication of their own fiction or criticism.
  
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    ENGL 5520r - Poetry Workshop


    (3) Credit Hours

    A course in which students write original poems and criticize each other’s work and the work of published poets. Discussion is based on the study of traditional and innovative forms, techniques, and poetic principles, and on the reading of a variety of poetry from around the world.
  
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    ENGL 5620 - Literature of England: 1300-1500


    (3) Credit Hours

    Reading in medieval English literature, including selections from Chaucer and the Gawain-poet as well as debate poems, historical poems, and short religious and secular lyrics. Emphasis on critical approaches to medieval poetry.
  
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    ENGL 5630 - Chaucer


    (3) Credit Hours

    A critical introduction to Canterbury Tales or to Troilus and Criseyde, with emphasis on reading and translation skills, historical and philosophical background, and critical thinking and writing.
  
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    ENGL 5650 - Early English Drama


    (3) Credit Hours

    Early English drama (950-1550), including liturgical drama, selections from the Wakefield, York, and other cycles, and the humanist drama of the early Renaissance. Texts are studied in the original Middle English and Early Modern English.
  
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    ENGL 5670 - Shakespeare: The Career


    (3) Credit Hours

    A study of examples of the plays (comedy, history, tragedy, romance) with attention to stage craft, themes, artistic development, the poetry, poetics, and bibliography.
  
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    ENGL 5690 - Non-Dramatic Literature of the English Renaissance


    (6) Credit Hours

    Representative works of non-dramatic prose and poetry from the Renaissance period.
  
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    ENGL 5710 - The Age of Dryden, Pope, and Swift


    (3) Credit Hours

    Readings and studies of selected writings from Restoration and early eighteenth-century England (1660-1745). In addition to Dryden, Pope, and Swift, the course includes such figures as Addison, Steele, Gay, Defoe, Behn, Congreve, and Butler.
  
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    ENGL 5720 - The Age of Samuel Johnson


    (3) Credit Hours

    Readings and studies of selected poetry, fiction, drama, and prose of middle and later eighteenth-century England (1745-1789), with special emphasis on Samuel Johnson and his circle. In addition to Johnson, includes such figures as Boswell, Gray, Collins, Goldsmith, Reynolds, Burke, and Smart.
  
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    ENGL 5730 - Development of the British Novel in the 18th and 19th Centuries


    (3) Credit Hours

    Reading and studies tracing the development of the British novel from its origins in the eighteenth century through Dickens, George Eliot, and their contemporaries in the nineteenth century.
  
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    ENGL 5740 - British Literature of the Romantic Period


    (3) Credit Hours

    Assignments in the principal British authors of the period 1798–1834—Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Blake, Keats, and Shelley—with emphasis on the developing Romantic traditions in English art and thought.
  
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    ENGL 5750 - Victorian Literature


    (3) Credit Hours

    Assignments in the principal British authors of the period 1834–1900—Carlyle, J.S. Mill, Newman, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Ruskin, Dickens, and others––with special emphasis on defining the characteristics of “Victorianism,” as manifested in the representative writings of the period.
  
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    ENGL 5760 - British Transitional Literature


    (3) Credit Hours

    A critical examination of representative English and Anglo-Irish authors of the period 1880–1920, with emphasis on analyzing the “transition” from late Victorian art and thought to early Modernism.
  
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    ENGL 5780 - Post-Modern British Literature: 1965–Present


    (3) Credit Hours

    The year 1965, approximately, marked an epoch in Western culture and witnessed the advent of new cultural models of reality and therefore also new modes and methods of fiction. This course assesses the relevance of this moment to contemporary British literature, whether or not some works seem to fulfill a peculiarly “post-modernist” vision.
  
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    ENGL 5820 - English Literature, Genre: The Short Poem in English


    (3) Credit Hours

    Students study short poems (1-500 lines) in English, in relation to history, genre, techniques (such as meter, structure, imagery, metaphor, figurative devices), meaning, and aesthetic and moral judgment.
  
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    ENGL 5850r - Seminar in a Major Figure


    (3) Credit Hours

    A seminar course devoted to a major writer in English. The course will consider biography, time and place, relationship to literary history, forms and themes. May be repeated only once, with different content. (See class schedule for current offerings.)
  
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    ENGL 5865 - Children’s Literature


    3 Credit Hours

    Investigation of the historical foundations and contemporary trends in children’s literature with critical and theoretical interrogation of the production, quality, and dissemination of this literature.
    3.000 Credit hours Lecture
  
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    ENGL 5885 - Literature for Adolescents


    3 Credit Hours

    Three hours lecture. Consideration of the concept of adolescence, the characteristics of young adult literature, and the literary criticism used to analyze texts for adolescents.
  
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    ENGL 5950r - Workshop: Writing


    (3) Credit Hours

    Advanced work in professional writing, creative or expository. Students will do much writing of their own, will study and apply concepts for analyzing and criticizing the writings of others in the seminar.
  
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    ENGL 5970r - Topics in English Studies


    (1-3) Credit Hours

    Selected advanced topics of current interest in English studies not available in other graduate courses. May be repeated with different topics.
  
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    ENGL 5997r - Individual Studies


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Every semester. Prerequisite: department head approval. Department may have additional prerequisite requirements. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration.
  
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    ENGL 5998r - Research


    (1-9) Credit Hours

    Enables students to conduct independent research. Credit hours allowed toward the degree may be limited. Student must submit an Individual Studies/Research Contract to the Records Office at the time of registration. Prerequisite: department head approval.
  
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    ENGL 5999r - Thesis


    (1–6) Credit Hours

    The development of a project of thesis magnitude and quality. Oral defense required. Maximum of six hours graded credit to be applied toward degree. Must register for course until thesis is completed. Prerequisite: approval of department head.

Engineering Management

  
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    ENGM 5040 - Decision Making and Optimization Techniques


    (3) Credit Hours

    Engineering and mathematical optimization techniques for engineering/engineering management applications will be covered with an understanding of how the techniques can be applied, the mechanics of application, and the use in assisting the engineer/engineering manager. Topics are classical optimization techniques, probabilistic techniques, linear programming, dynamic programming, inventory, and waiting lines. Topics will focus on application of techniques to various industry segments such as research, manufacturing, transportation, distribution, and services. Prerequisite: department head approval. May be registered as ENGR 5040. Credit not allowed in both ENGM 5040 and ENGR 5040. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5500 - Concepts in Engineering Management


    (3) Credit Hours

    This course presents the basics of the operational theory and science of management. The essentials of management that are pertinent to practicing managers are emphasized. The theory, principles, and techniques are presented as an art — applying the science of the underlying organized knowledge of management to the realities of situations. Management is presented as a part of a larger system interacting with the total environment and encompassing economic technological, social, political, and ethical issues. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5510 - Legal and Ethical Perspectives in Engineering


    (3) Credit Hours

    Course objectives are (I) to introduce the engineering manager to moral reasoning, ethical theories ethical principles, ethical rules, and foundation for ethical decisions as managers, (2) to describe the legal boundaries in which engineering managers must function, and (3) evaluate contemporary cases confronting engineering managers. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5520 - Reliability Engineering


    (3) Credit Hours

    Concepts and methods of reliability engineering. Included are the theoretical and practical tools for the design, production, testing, and maintenance of engineering systems and components having a predictably low probability of failure. A systems approach to reliability management is emphasized. The topics will focus on practical application of techniques for improvement during design, start-up, and steady-state operation of products and processes from the technical manager’s perspective. Prerequisite: department head approval. May be registered as ENGR 5520. Credit not allowed in both ENGM 5520 and ENGR 5520. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5540 - Technical Project Management


    (3) Credit Hours

    All aspects of project management are covered with emphasis on human and institutional interactions that occur during management of technical projects. Methods of resource identification and allocation, integration of scheduling and cost factors, development of project plans and control are addressed. Project control methods such as PERT and CPM are introduced. A project case study is carried through the semester to illustrate decisions and problems encountered in technical project management. Individual presentations required. May be registered as ENGR 5540. Credit not allowed in both ENGM 5540 and ENGR 5540. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5550 - Technical Entrepreneurship and Leadership


    (3) Credit Hours

    An examination technology, organizational, and human factor issues in technology companies of all sizes. Differences between entrepreneurship, technological leadership, innovation and trusteeship are examined. Technological leadership and technological entrepreneurship are explored for various stages of a company’s development and for various sizes of companies. A framework for examining principles of technological leadership and entrepreneurship in an operating enterprise will be applied to case studies. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5560 - Quality Management Systems


    (3) Credit Hours

    Introduction to quality management principles including its history, the role of total quality, and the philosophical perspectives supporting total quality. In-depth look at the management system and its relationship to total quality. Investigation of technical issues and the role of tools and techniques in the quality management process including methods, quality improvement and associated management models, and reliability in design and production. Exploration of methods of building and sustaining quality organizations. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5570 - Advanced Quality Control


    (3) Credit Hours

    The design and analysis of quality systems. Fundamental coverage of statistical process control, quality control concepts, control charts, product specifications, process control, acceptance sampling systems, and other means of assurance widely used in many industries to improve product and service quality and to reduce costs. Prerequisite: department head approval. May be registered as ENGR 5570. Credit not allowed in both ENGM 5570 and ENGR 5570. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5580 - Advanced Engineering Economy


    (3) Credit Hours

    The design and analysis of financial strategies in a technical environment. Emphasis is on the application of these strategies in competitive industry. Core topics include review and application of basic engineering economy concepts, mathematical techniques and models, treatment of risk and uncertainties, cost of capital, demand and price elasticity as it applies to capital investment decisions, financial statements, financial ratio analysis, taxes and inflation, capital budgeting, and financial planning. Special topics include ethics and legal perspectives. Prerequisite: department head approval. May be registered as ENGR 5580. Credit not allowed in both ENGR 5580 and ENGM 5580. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5600 - Sustainability and LEED


    (3) Credit Hours

    A comprehensive course that will provide introductory knowledge and information regarding the newest version of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) requirements for LEED accredited professionals. The class will cover the five categories of LEED: Sustainable Sites, Water Efficiency, Energy and Atmosphere, Materials and Resources, and Indoor Environmental Quality. Prerequisite: department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
  
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    ENGM 5610 - Construction Law: Contracts and Claims


    (3) Credit Hours

    This course focuses on the legal problems and concerns frequently encountered by constructors and others who participate in the construction process. Topics include the formation of contracts and the various contractual relationships; methods of modification and termination of the contracts; exploration of licensure and professional liability of the construction practitioner. Prerequisite: ENGM 5510 or department head approval. Supplementary course fee assessed.
 

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